Newgrange

Sí an Bhrú
County Meath

The passage tomb of Newgrange is one of the most remarkable buildings of the Stone Age and, together with the tombs of Dowth and Knowth, is one of the most important archaeological findings of Brú na Bóinne in the Boyne Valley. Since 1993 these ancient tombs belong to the UNESCO world cultural heritage.

The majestic burial mound towers above the surrounding landscape at a height of 13 metres (85 metres in diameter). But it is his “inner values” that make him so special. Below the hill is a burial chamber constructed by Stone Age builders in such a way that even after more than 5,000 years no water can penetrate. A rather inconspicuous shaft is located directly above the entrance to the tomb and is the starting point of an incredible phenomenon at the winter solstice. In the morning hours of 21 December, the light of the low sun shines through this shaft and illuminates the passage and the chamber for a few minutes. This event marks the end of the dark season and was of corresponding importance in the annual cycle of the Stone Age settlers. If you want to attend this thousand-year-old spectacle, you can fill in an application form in the Brú na Bóinne Visitor Centre and with a little luck you will be drawn as a participant.

Newgrange can be visited all year round on a guided tour. Starting point is the Brú na Bóinne Visitor Centre.

The age of Newgrange is often pointed out especially in comparison to the pyramids of Giza. Newgrange dates back to around 3,150 B.C., while the buildings on the Nile were not built until a few centuries later between 2,620 and 2,500 B.C.

Co. Meath
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